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David Herrin, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Director of the Vibro-Acoustics Consortium

Research Area

Contact

859-218-0609
002b Ralph G. Anderson Building

Appointments

January, 2012 – Present: Associate Professor, University of Kentucky

July, 2011 – December, 2011: Associate Research Professor, University of Kentucky

2004 – June, 2011: Research Assistant Professor, University of Kentucky

2000 - 2003: Post-Doctoral Scholar, University of Kentucky

1993 - 2000: Instructor / Research Assistant / Teaching Assistant, University of Kentucky

1991-1993: Research Assistant, University of Cincinnati

1987-1990: Co-op Engineer, Stuctural Dynamics Research Corporation, Milford, OH


Education

Ph.D. Mechanical Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 2000

M.S. Engineering Mechanics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 1993

B.S. Mechanical Engineering, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 1991


When David Herrin came to the University of Kentucky to obtain his Ph.D., he was interested in anything that involved finite element analysis and modeling. Eventually, that led him to the field of acoustics. Today, Herrin’s experimental acoustics team conducts research in an Eckel anechoic chamber—a highly controlled environment for making noise measurements. Perforated metal wedges house fibers that absorb sound so that almost no noise is reflected from the walls back to the source. Upon entering the chamber, visitors often exclaim “Whoa!” only to discover the unique environment has significantly muted their surprise.

Herrin’s research is part of an ongoing partnership with the 20+ member Vibro-Acoustics Consortium. Twice a year, consortium members gather for presentations that specialize in noise and vibrational control for heavy equipment, engines and HVAC products. Membership in the consortium has doubled in the last 10 years.

In the News:

Herrin talks about the muffling effect of snow

Research Interests:

Acoustic Materials

Acoustics

Mufflers and Silencers

Structural Dynamics