SECTION II:  PROGRAM OBJECTIVES AND CURRICULUM

 

A.         PROGRAM OBJECTIVES

           

The objectives of the undergraduate program in the Department of Mining Engineering focus on the intellectual and personal development of our students so that our graduates will have:

 


·        strong general-purpose engineering skills, including an ability to design experiments, analyze data, and define and solve technical problems in a real world context;

·        a full understanding of the core technical disciplines, analytical procedures, and design practices of the mining engineering profession and an ability to apply them in practice;

·        professional skills that will help them to be effective on the job, including strong communications competence and an ability to work within interdisciplinary teams;

·        an understanding of the critical roles of engineers in society and their ethical responsibility to keep the health, safety, and welfare of the public first in their professional practice; and

·        an appreciation of the need for, and an ability to engage in continued personal growth and learning throughout their adult lives, including an awareness of changing contemporary societal issues and their impact on the profession.         

 

For an outline of the specific means that our department uses to meet these objectives, consult the department web page at http://www.engr.uky.edu/mng/index.html.             

 

           

B.            ADVISING

 

            The Department of Mining Engineering wants its students to succeed both academically and in extra­curricular ventures. To this end, faculty serve willingly as advisors.  Each student is assigned a faculty member with whom the student should consult on course and elective selection, scheduling and registration, grades and academic record, as well as broader issues of life at the University of Kentucky, cooperative work experiences, and post-baccalaureate careers or graduate school.  Your advisor is assigned to you for the duration of your college career.

 

            The student should have a friendly relationship with his or her advisor.  Stopping by to see your advisor, both when there are problems and when there are successes, is encouraged.  Respect your advisor's office hours, however; if he is out of his office then leave a message for him with the receptionist.  If a problem is urgent, the receptionist should be able to find someone else to help you.  In the unlikely event that you do not get along with your advisor, ask the Department Chairman to reassign you.

 

            The student must remember that ultimately he or she is responsible for the successful completion of his or her program.  The student must learn the rules and requirements of the program; advisors and guidance material are meant to assist the student. Do not be trapped into extra unnecessary coursework or semesters because advice was not sought in a timely fashion.


C.         CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN     MINING ENGINEERING

 

 

 

 

FRESHMAN YEAR

FIRST SEMESTER

 

SECOND SEMESTER

CHE 105 General College Chemistry I

3

 

CHE 107 General College Chemistry II

3

CS 221 First Course in Comp. Sci. for Engineers

2

 

ENG 102 Writing II

3

ENG 101 Writing I                                           

3

 

MA  114 Calculus II

4

MA 113 Calculus I                  

4

 

MNG 264 Mining Methods

3

MNG 101 Introduction to Mng. Engr.

1

 

PHY 231 Gen University Physics

4

*    University Studies

3

 

PHY 241 Gen. University Physics Laboratory

1

 

16

 

 

18

 

 

 

 

 

SOPHOMORE YEAR

FIRST SEMESTER

 

 

SECOND SEMESTER

 

ECO 201 Principles of Economics I        

3

 

EM 302 Mechanics of Deformable Solids

3

EM  221 Statics

3

 

MA  214 Calculus IV               

3

MA  213 Calculus III

4

 

ME  220 Engineering Thermodynamics I 

3

MNG 331 Explosives and Blasting

2

 

MNG 211 Surveying               

2

PHY 232 General University Physics

4

 

MNG 291 Mineral Reserve Modeling

2

PHY 242 Gen. University Physics Laboratory

1

 

MNG 303 Deformable Solids Laboratory

1

 

17

 

MNG 332 Mine Plant Machinery

3

 

 

 

 

17

JUNIOR YEAR

FIRST SEMESTER

 

 

SECOND SEMESTER

 

COM 199 Presentational Communication Skills

1

 

EM  313 Dynamics

3

EE  305 Electrical Circuits and Electronics

3

 

GLY 230 Fundamentals of Geology I

3

GLY 220 Principles of Physical Geology

4

 

MNG 335 Intro. to Mine Systems Analysis

3

ME 330 Fluid Mechanics

3

 

MNG 463 Surface Mine Design and Env. Issues

3

MNG 301 Minerals Processing

3

 

*** Minerals Processing Technical Elective

3

MNG 302 Minerals Processing Laboratory

1

 

*  University Studies

3

MNG 371 Professional Dev. of Mining Engineers

3

 

 

18

 

18

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SENIOR YEAR

FIRST SEMESTER

 

 

SECOND SEMESTER

 

MNG 341 Mine Ventilation

3

 

MNG 592 Mine Design Project II

3

MNG 431 Mine Sys. Engineering and Valuation

4

 

**  Supportive Elective            

3

MNG 551 Rock Mechanics     

4

 

† Technical Elective               

3

MNG 591 Mine Design Project I

1

 

Technical Elective

3

*   University Studies              

3

 

*   University Studies

3

 

15

 

 

15

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total hours = 134

 

 

 

 


 

* Selected from University Studies areas in Social Sciences (6 credits), Humanities (6 credits), and Cross-Cultural (3 credits) in consultation with academic advisor.  Of these totals, 3 credits of Social Sciences are fulfilled by ECO 201.  A minimum of 15 credits in the humanities and social sciences are required. 

 

** The supportive elective is to be chosen from any University course outside the student’s major excluding more elementary versions of required courses such as precalculus mathematics.

 

*** The Minerals Processing Technical Elective is to be chosen between MNG 575 – Coal Preparation Design and MNG 580 – Mineral Processing Plant Design. 

 

† Courses recommended as technical electives are listed below.  These courses must be chosen with the approval of the student’s advisor to ensure that the curriculum includes sufficient engineering design content. 

 

Technical Electives.  Of the two technical electives in the undergraduate program, students are required to select at least one from departmental courses.  The remaining course, chosen with the approval of the student’s advisor, can be used to fulfill specific educational goals. 

 

MNG 511 Mine Power System Design

MNG 561 Mine Construction Engineering I

MNG 563 Simulation of Industrial Production Systems

MNG 572 Advanced Coal Preparation

MNG 575 Coal Preparation Design

MNG 580 Mineral Processing Plant Design

MNG 581 Geostatistics

MNG 599 Topic in Mining Engineering

BAE 438G Fundamentals of Groundwater Hydrology

CE 441 Fluid Mechanics II

CE 471G Soil Mechanics

GLY 450G Sedimentary Geology

GLY 585 Hydrogeology

PLS 501 Reclamation of Disturbed Land

 

 

 

 



D.         MINING ENGINEERING DEGREE CHECKLIST

 

 

 

Semester ___________________                            Student Name _______________________________

 

 

Subject Area

Course

Transfer and

Selected

Courses

Credits

Grade

Communication

7 credits

ENG 101

 

3

 

ENG 102

 

3

 

COM 1991,2

 

1

 

Mathematics

15 credits

MA  1131

 

4

 

MA  114

 

4

 

MA  213

 

4

 

MA  214

 

3

 

Basic Sciences

(Natural

Sciences)

23 credits

CHE 1051

 

3

 

CHE 1071

 

3

 

GLY 220

 

4

 

GLY 230

 

3

 

PHY 231

 

4

 

PHY 232

 

4

 

PHY 241

 

1

 

PHY 242

 

1

 

Foreign Language

6 credits

(or 2 years H.S.)

 

 

(3)

 

 

 

(3)

 

Social Sciences

6 credits

ECO 2011

 

3

 

(Select)1,3

 

3

 

Humanities

6 credits

(Select)1,3

 

3

 

(Select)1,3

 

3

 

Cross-Cultural

3 credits

(Select)1,3

 

3

 


 

 

Engineering Sciences (4)

19 credits

ME  330

 

3

 

EE  305

 

3

 

EM 221

 

3

 

EM 302

 

3

 

MNG 303

 

1

 

EM  313

 

3

 

ME  220

 

3

 

Major Courses

50 credits

MNG 101

 

1

 

MNG 211

 

2

 

MNG 264

 

3

 

MNG 291

 

2

 

MNG 301

 

3

 

MNG 302

 

1

 

MNG 331

 

2

 

MNG 332

 

3

 

MNG 335

 

3

 

MNG 341

 

3

 

MNG 3711,2

 

3

 

MNG 431

 

4

 

MNG 463

 

3

 

MNG 551

 

4

 

MNG 591

 

1

 

MNG 5921,2

 

3

 

Min. Proc. Tech Elec.

 

3

 

Technical Elective1,4

 

3

 

Technical Elective4

 

3

 

Other Courses Required by the Major

5 credits

CS  221

 

2

 

Supportive Elective1,5

 

3

 

TOTAL CREDITS

 

 

134

 

 



FOOTNOTES:

 

1       University Studies course.

 

2       MNG 371 Professional Development of Mining Engineers (three credits) and 592 Mine Design Project II (three credits) provide two additional credits of oral communication.

 

3       See University and Departmental rules on selecting University Studies courses.

 

4       Of the two technical electives provided in the undergraduate program, students are required to select at least one from departmental courses.  The remaining course, chosen with the approval of the student's advisor, should be used to enhance specific educational goals.

 

5       The supportive elective is to be chosen from any university course outside the student’s major excluding more elementary versions of required courses, such as precalculus mathematics.

 


E.         UNIVERSITY STUDIES PROGRAM

 

1.         PURPOSE

 

The University Studies program is designed to give the student the elements of education essential to a university degree.  You will notice that the Univer­sity Studies requirements include math, foreign language, inference-logic, written and oral communication, natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, cross-cultural, and electives.  The University Studies requirements keep your education from becoming one dimensional, narrow, or excessively parochial.  The student is encouraged to study these requirements well so as to obtain maximum benefit from the courses selected.

 

2.      SOME CONSTRAINTS

 

The selection of University Studies courses has a number of constraints.  In the University Bulletin, for Area I, Math, the requirement is met by MA 113.  In Area II, Foreign Language, the student must present evidence of two years of study of a foreign language in high school or take a two-course sequence in a single foreign language.  In Area III, Inference-Logic, the requirement is met by MA 113.  In Area IV, Written Communication, the requirement is met by ENG 101 and ENG 102.  In Area V, the oral communication requirement is met by taking COM 199 (one credit) plus MNG 371 and MNG 592, each containing one credit of oral communication.  In Area VI, Natural Sciences, the requirement is met by CHE 105 and CHE 107.  In Area VII, Social Sciences, the student is required to take two courses in separate disciplines from a list of social science courses.  This requirement can be met by taking ECO 201 plus one other course, excluding another economics course, from the list of social sciences courses.   The humanities requirement, Area VIII, is met by taking six credits from among the approved humanities courses.  In Area IX, Cross-Cultural, the requirement is met by taking one of the approved cross-cultural courses.  Finally, Area X, Electives, is met by the one of the technical electives plus the supportive elective. 

 

3.      COURSE SELECTION

 

Review the University Studies Program before attempting to select courses; they are in the Bulletin and the Semester Schedule.  Know your own interests and select courses accordingly.  Remember, the rules repre­sent minima; nothing but time constraints prevents the student from taking additional coursework.

 

I.            Math.  Satisfied by MA 113.

 

II.          Foreign Language.  If you have not had a for­eign language for a minimum of two years in high school, then you must take at least one year of a foreign language in addition to the published degree requirements.

 

III.       Inference-Logic.  Satisfied by MA 113.

 

IV.       Written Communication.  Satisfied by ENG 101 and ENG 102.

 

V.         Oral Communication.  The sequence of COM 199, MNG 371, and MNG 592 contains three credits of oral communication.

 

VI.       Natural Sciences.  Satisfied by CHE 105 and CHE 107.

 

VII.    Social Sciences.  Satisfied by ECO 201 plus one additional course from approved list excluding another economics course.

 

VIII.  Humanities.  Satisfied by six credits of courses from the humanities list.

 

IX.       Cross-Cultural.  Satisfied by one course from the cross-cultural list. 

 

X.         Electives.  Satisfied by one Technical Elective plus the Supportive Elective.  The Supportive Elective is to be chosen from any university course outside the student’s major excluding more elementary versions of required courses, such as precalculus mathematics.

 

The student should be aware that not all courses listed in the Bulletin are offered every semester.  The courses listed in bold-faced type in the University Studies Program section of the Schedule of Classes are offered during that semester. 

 

 

F.         SELECTING SUPPORTIVE AND TECHNICAL ELECTIVES

 

1.         SUPPORTIVE ELECTIVE

 

The supportive elective allows students to explore new subjects or to expand upon familiar ones.  Courses for the supportive elective may be chosen from any major in the University.  The Department of Mining Engineering encourages the student to obtain every benefit possible from this selection; consideration should be given to career goals, special talents, or subjects that have been enjoyed in earlier courses.  The only specific prohibition excludes courses, such as precalculus mathematics, that are more elementary than those required for the major.

 

2.         TECHNICAL ELECTIVES

 

a.       Minerals Processing Technical Elective.  The student is required to take one minerals processing technical elective, either MNG 575 – Coal Preparation Design or MNG 580 – Mineral Processing Plant Design. 

 

b.      Technical Electives.  The student is required to take two additional technical electives.  One of these courses must be offered  by the Mining Engineering Department; the other course may be outside the department but must be selected from the following list, or with consent of the advisor.  In choosing these courses, the student should establish a theme that becomes an informal concentration such as minerals processing, underground coal mining, surface mining, ventilation, mine power systems, and so on. 

 

i.             Mining Engineering Courses

 

MNG 511 – Mine Power System Design

MNG 561 – Mine Construction Engineering I

MNG 563 – Simulation of Industrial Production Systems

MNG 572 – Advanced Coal Preparation

MNG 575 – Coal Preparation Design

MNG 580 – Minerals Processing Plant Design

MNG 581 – Geostatistics

MNG 599 – Topic in Mining Engineering

 

ii.            Other Technical Electives

 

BAE 438G – Fundamentals of Groundwater Hydrology

CE 441 – Fluid Mechanics II

CE 471G – Soil Mechanics

GLY 450G Sedimentary Geology

GLY 585 – Hydrogeology

PLS 501 – Reclamation of Disturbed Lands

 

 

G.         ENGINEERING STANDING

 

         Admission to engineering standing in mining engineering is necessary to be granted a baccalaureate degree in mining engineering.  Students must complete 30 of the last 36 hours of their programs in residence at the University.  The criteria for obtaining engineering standing in mining engineering are listed below.  The same criteria are applied to transfer students.

 

Engineering standing criteria.  Completion of a minimum of 50 semester hours acceptable towards the degree in mining engineering with a minimum cumulative grade-point-average (GPA) of 2.5.  Completion of ENG 101 and ENG 102 (or ENG 105), MA 113, MA 114, MA 213, MA 214, CHE 105, CHE 107, PHY 231, PHY 232, PHY 241, and PHY 242 with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 in these courses.  University repeat options may be utilized as appropriate.  Students who do not meet these GPA requirements may request consideration based upon departmental review if both of these GPA values are 2.25 or greater. 

 

Many of the courses in the mining engineering curriculum require engineering standing as a perquisite for registration in that course.  These include:

 

MNG 341 – Mine Ventilation

MNG 371 – Professional Development of Mining Engineers

MNG 395 – Independent Work in Mining Engineering

MNG 431 – Mine Systems Engineering and Valuation

MNG 463 – Surface Mine Design and Environmental Issues

MNG 511 – Mine Power System Design

MNG 551 – Rock Mechanics

MNG 561 – Mine Construction Engineering I

MNG 563 – Simulation of Industrial Production Systems

MNG 575 – Coal Preparation Design

MNG 580 – Mineral Processing Plant Design

MNG 581 – Geostatistics

MNG 591 – Mine Design Project I

MNG 592 – Mine Design Project II

MNG 599 – Topic in Mining Engineering

 

 

H.     LIST OF MINING ENGINEERING COURSES

 

 

MNG 101          Introduction to Mining Engineering                                                (1)

 

Orientation to the mining engineering profession; introduction to key mining engineering activities and functions; mining methods and equipment; health and safety sub-systems. 

 

MNG 211          Mine Surveying                                                           (2)

 

Surveying as applied to mining engineering, including the use and care of surveying instruments, measurement of horizontal and vertical distances, angles and direction, collection of ground and underground data for the design and layout of surface and underground mineral workings, and some aspects of the precise determination of position and direction for survey control. Prereq:

MNG 101 and MA 114.

 

MNG 264          Mining Methods                                                                   (3)

 

A study of the principal underground and surface mining methods practiced in coal and hard rock mines, method classification: support and equipment requirements: general mine planning; sequence of development, cycle of operations, and method application and variation. Prereq: MNG 101.

 

MNG 291          Mineral Reserve Modeling                                                   (2)

Basic CAD drawing skills including drawing tools, basic dimensioning, coordinate systems, and crosshatching; concepts and approaches for estimation of spatial distribution of rock and mineral properties from sample data. The course emphasizes hands-on experience with mine design software for reserve estimation. Lecture, one hour; laboratory, two hours per week. Prereq: MNG 264

 


MNG 301          Minerals Processing                                                          (3)

 

Petrographic structure of ore and coal deposits, sampling theory, and particle motion in fluid streams.  Unit operations for processing particulate materials; breaking, screening, laundering, froth flotation and clarification.  Flowsheets, process selection and plant performance. Prereq: PHY 232.

 

MNG 302          Minerals Processing Laboratory                                                (1)

 

Application of principles studied in MNG 301.  Laboratory, two hours.  Prereq or concur: MNG 301.

 

MNG 303        Deformable Solids Laboratory                                     (1)

 

Experimental studies of the mechanical properties of materials and structural elements.  Laboratory, four hours per week for three-fourths of the semester.  Prereq or concur: EM 302.

 

MNG 331          Explosives and Blasting                                                     (2)

 

Drilling and drill performance, types and properties of commercial explosives, initiation and priming, explosives selection, blast design, explosives applications, environmental effects, and safety and regulatory compliance. Prereq: MNG 101, MNG 264, CHE 105, PHY 231.

 

MNG 332          Mine Plant Machinery                                                          (3)

 

Theory and practice of mine haulage, hoisting, drainage, and pumping. Application of engineering principles to the analysis and selection of materials handling mediums for the minerals industry.  Prereq: MNG 101, MNG 264, PHY 231.  Concur: EM 221.

 

MNG 335          Introduction to Mine Systems    Analysis                                     (3)

 

Descriptive statistics; random variables & probability distributions; point estimation; hypothesis testing; linear regression; time and motion study; introduction to geostatistics.  Prereq: MA 114, MNG 264.

 

MNG 341          Mine Ventilation                                                          (3)

 

Hazards of dust and gaseous contamination of mine atmosphere, air dilution requirements, flow distribution in mine network, computer analysis of the ventilation network, natural ventilation and fans.  Lecture, two hours; laboratory, three hours.  Prereq: PHY 231, CE 341 and engineering standing.

 


MNG 371          Professional Development of Mining Engineers                          (3)

 

Development of professional skills important to the practice of mining engineering.  Topics include written and oral communication skills, understanding ethical responsibility and appropriate ethical conduct, real world problem formulation and solution skills, exercise of abilities important to lifelong learning, knowledge of contemporary issues important to mining engineering. Prereq: COM 199, engineering standing.

 

MNG 374          Mine Valuation and Investment Analysis                                     (3)

 

Economic evaluation methods and applications to economic decision problems encountered in the mining industry, including the mine valuation problem. Prereq: MNG 264, MNG 301, STA 381, engineering standing.

 

MNG 395          Independent Work in Mining Engineering                                        (1‑6)

 

Individual work on some selected problem in the field of mining engineering.  May be repeated for a maximum of six credits.  Prereq: Consent of department chairperson and the instructor, engineering standing.

 

MNG 431          Mine Systems Engineering and Valuation                                    (4)

 

Characterization and analysis of mine production systems, including economic considerations. Topics include basic production systems concepts, work sampling, standard time models, scheduling, PERT/CPM, engineering economics, mine valuation. Prereq: MNG 332, MNG 335, engineering standing.

 

MNG 463          Surface Mine Design & Environmental Issues                                (3)

 

Pit layout and design of excess spoil disposal areas including stability of the slopes. Design of sediment control systems to satisfy surface mine regulations. Use of design standards for various reclamation alternatives. Prereq: MNG 264, engineering standing.

 

 MNG 511          Mine Power System Design                                                       (3)

 

A study of mine power distribution systems, major power system components, and techniques of power system analysis. Topics include per-unit analysis; symmetrical component analysis; grounding, including ground-bed design, ground-resistor sizing, and ground wire monitoring; cable and transformer sizing; and load-flow analysis.  Course may not be used to satisfy degree requirements in electrical engineering if credit is earned in EE 538. Prereq: EE 306 or equivalent, and engineering standing.

 


MNG 551          Rock Mechanics                                                          (4)

 

Determination of the physical properties of rocks, rock mass classification, stress around mine openings, strain and displacement of the rock mass, rock reinforcement and support, stress interaction and subsidence, strata control.  Lecture, three hours; laboratory three hours per week.  Prereq: EM 302, MNG 303, GLY 240 and engineering standing.

 

MNG 561          Mine Construction Engineering I                                             (3)

 

Development of underground capital openings (shafts, chambers, tunnels, and drifts) in mines.  Design and construction under normal conditions.  Organization and management of construction operations.  Prereq:  MNG 551.

 

MNG 563          Simulation of Industrial Production Systems                                     (3)

 

Discrete event simulation and its application to performance analysis of industrial production systems. Topics include concepts for characterizing production systems, approaches to structuring simulation models, instruction in a simulation language, and techniques for comparing alternative system designs and control strategies.  Applications to manufacturing, commercial and mining production systems are considered. Prereq: CS 221 or 270, STA 281 or 381, engineering standing. (Same as MFS 563).

 

MNG 572          Advanced Coal Preparation                                                        (3)

 

Study of economic and environmental factors in cleaning a specific coal, laboratory tests for process selection, laboratory testing of alternative procedures leading to design of plant.  Lecture, two hours; laboratory, three hours per week.  Prereq: MNG 301 and engineering standing.

 

MNG 575          Coal Preparation Design                                                       (3)

 

Design a coal preparation plant by integrating unit operations preceded by certain back-up laboratory experiments.  Cost sensitivity analysis of competing design schemes will be determined on a selected coal.  Lecture, two hours; laboratory, three hours per week.  Prereq: MNG 301 or equivalent, engineering standing.

 

MNG 580          Mineral Processing Plant Design                                              (3)

 

Design of mineral processing plants including the associated unit operations; flowsheet development, unit selection, sizing and number, water/mass flow balancing. Prereq: MNG 301, MNG 302, engineering standing.

 


MNG 581          Geostatistics                                                                      (3)

 

The geostatistics approach for estimating the spatial distribution of rock and mineral properties.  Topics include treatment of the spatial distribution of ore grade as regionalized variables, covariance stationary processes, variograms, volume/variance relations, ordinary kriging, block grade distributions, and nonlinear kriging approaches.  Prereq:  STA 381, engineering standing.

 

MNG 591          Mine Design Project I                                                                (1)

 

Students will undertake a design project consisting of reserve analysis of a given mine property.  They will calculate minable reserves and analyze mining and quality properties of coal.  Each student will write a report supported by maps and will present it orally before a group of peers and invited experts.  Lecture, one hour, laboratory, one hour per week.  Prereq: MNG 332, engineering standing.

 

MNG 592          Mine Design Project II                                                      (3)

 

Students will undertake a major design project such as the overall design of a mining system, including design of major components of the system and economic evaluation. Students will write reports documenting this design, which will also be presented orally before a group of peers and invited experts. Lecture, two hours, laboratory, two hours per week.  Prereq: MNG 341, MNG 551, MNG 591, and engineering standing.

 

MNG 599          Topic in Mining Engineering                                                         (2‑3)

 

A detailed investigation of a topic of current significance in mining engineering.  May be repeated to a maximum of six credits, but only three credits can be earned under the same title.  A particular topic may be offered at most twice under the MNG 599 number.  Prereq: engineering standing and consent of instructor.

 

MNG 611          Mine Power System Protection                                         (3)

 

A study of components and methods for providing protection to mine electrical systems. Review topics include power distribution arrangements, per-unit system, and symmetrical components. Course topics include sources of transients and faults, protective equipment, phase over-current relaying, and ground fault protection. Lecture, two and one-half hours; lab, one and one-half hours per week. Prereq: MNG 511.

 

MNG 634          Advanced Mine Engineering                                                         (3)

 

Procedures and methods of obtaining data and analyzing mine systems for efficient development and exploitation of a mining property.  Course includes applications of operation research techniques.  Prereq: CE 555, CS/MA/STA 482G.

 

MNG 637          Rock Slope Stability and Design                                                (3)

 

Design and stability analysis of rock slopes using analytical, empirical, and numerical approaches, engineering geological data, groundwater pressure, blasting, and remedial measures.  Prereq: MNG 551.

 

MNG 641          Advanced Mine Ventilation                                                 (3)

 

Planning, designing and redesigning the ventilation systems using computers; data acquisition (ventilation survey); non‑steady state flow in mine openings; influence of the ventilation conditions upon the dynamics of the methane concentration; automation of the ventilation system.  Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours.  Prereq: MNG 341.

 

MNG 681          Geostatistics II                                                         (3)

 

A second course in geostatistics for mine planning and geotechnical applications.  Topics include co-regionalized variables and co-kriging, non-parametric geostatistics (indicator, probability, and soft kriging), loss functions and optimum predictors for ore selection decisions, conditional simulation techniques and applications.  Prereq: MNG 681.

 

MNG 690          Advanced Mineral Beneficiation Engineering                                 (3)

 

State‑of‑the‑art techniques in mineral beneficiation and their application in coal and mineral preparation industry.  Prereq: MNG 301 and MNG 572.

 

MNG 691          Simulation of Mineral Processing Circuits                                      (3)

 

Flow-sheet modeling and analysis for coal preparation and ore dressing plants.  Topics include unit models for comminution, gravity separation, and froth flotation; relevant techniques for solving systems of nonlinear equations; convergence acceleration techniques; sequential modular, simultaneous modular, and equation-solving flowsheeting frameworks; flowgraph techniques for analysis of certain classes of mineral processing circuits. Prereq: MNG 575

 

MNG 699          Topics in Mining Engineering                                                (3)

 

A detailed investigation of a topic of current interest in mining engineering. May be repeated to a maximum of six credits, but only three credits may be earned under the same subtitle. A particular topic may be offered only twice under the MNG 699 number. Prereq: Consent of instructor. 

 

MNG 748          Master’s Thesis Research                                                   (0)

Half-time to full-time work on thesis. May be repeated to a maximum of six semesters. Prereq: All course work toward the degree must be completed.

 

MNG 749          Dissertation Research                                                              (0)

 

Half‑time to full‑time work on dissertation.  May be repeated to a maximum of six semesters.  Prereq: Registration for two full‑time semesters of 769 residence credit following the successful completion of the qualifying exams.

 

MNG 768          Residence Credit for the Master's Degree                                       (1‑6)

 

May be repeated to a maximum of 12 hours.

 

MNG 769          Residence Credit for Doctor's Degree                                       (0‑12)

 

May be repeated indefinitely.

 

MNG 771          Seminar in Mining Engineering                                                (1)

 

Review of current research in specific areas of mining engineering.  Required of all graduate students.  Prereq: Graduate classification.

 

MNG 780          Special Problems in Mining Engineering                                        (1‑6)

 

Individual work on some selected design problems in one area of mining engineering.  May be repeated to a maximum of six credits.  Prereq: Approval of the chairperson of the department.

 

MNG 790          Special Research Problems in Mining Engineering                                 (1‑9)

 

Individual work on some selected problems in one of the various fields of mining engineering.  Laboratory and field measurements, six hours.  May be repeated to a maximum of nine credits.  Prereq: Approval of the Director of Graduate Studies.