Results of 
        percolation model of leakage current through Silica. Beck Research Group:  
        Advancing technology through quantum mechanical calculations in Materials Science.  
        Principal Investigator:  Matthew J. Beck

Group Personnel

The Computational Materials research group @ UK draws members from diverse backgrounds and sustains collaborations with researchers in Physics, Electrical Engineering, Materials Science, and Chemical Engineering, from both industry and Academia. For information on collaborative oppurtunities, please contact Prof. Beck.

Current Group Members

Matthew J. Beck, Principal Investigator

Prof. Beck joined the Department of Chemical & Materials Engineering at the University of Kentucky in July 2009. He has undergraduate and graduate degress in Materials Science & Engineering from the University of Michigan and Northwestern University, respectively. He was a post-doc and later a Research Assistant Professor in the Physics Department at Vanderbilt University before coming to UK. Prof. Beck's research interests are summarized on the research page. He enjoys playing the Wii, audio books, soccer, football, and spending time with his family.

Personal Webpage - Curriculum Vita

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Xing Huang, Graduate Student

Xing Huang is a graduate student who joined the Beck research group in August 2009. Currently, his research interest is unveiling the reason that the ultra small ceria nanoparticle (USCNP) exhibits marvelously improved catalytic performance and extend the properties of USCNP to energy and biomedical application. His work will apply ab-initio calculation to show the atomic and electronic structure of USCNP and combine experiments to substantiate the calculation results in retrospect.

Personal Webpage

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Yuan Lu, Graduate Student

Yuan is a graduate student who joined the Beck Research group in August 2010.

Personal Webpage

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Rui Li, Undergraduate Research Assistant

Rui joined the Beck Research Group in early 2011 to bring her Mathematics background to bear on problems related to the computational implementation of advanced quantum mechanical methods. Rui is a Math major at UK, and plans to graduate in Spring 2013.

Personal Webpage

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Megan LaRue, Undergraduate Research Assistant

Megan is a Computer Science major at Kentucky State University and began working with the Beck Group and Prof. Chi Shen at KSU in February 2011. Megan will be implementating advanced quantum mechanical methods in the Socorro code.

Personal Webpage

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Former Group Members

Daniele Scopece, Visiting Graduate Student

Daniele was a visiting graduate student from University of Milano-Biccoca with the Beck Research group for Spring and Summer 2010. Daniele conducted quantum mechanical calculations of the surface energy of Ge surfaces. Daniele plans to complete his Ph. D. in 2011.

Personal Webpage


Collaborators

Rich Eitel, Department of Chemical \& Materials Science, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY

Chi Shen, Department of Computer and Technical Sciences, Kentucky State University, Frankfort, KY

Fuqian Yang, Department of Chemical & Materials Science, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY

Leo Miglio, Department of Materials Science, University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan, Italy

Francesco Montalenti, Department of Materials Science, University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan, Italy

Y. T. Cheng, Department of Chemical & Materials Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY

Michael Sheetz, Center for Computational Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY

Ryan Hatcher, Lockheed Martion Advanced Technology Lab, Cherry Hill, NJ

Normand Modine, Center for Integrated Nanotechnology, Sandia National Labs, Albuquerque, NM

Uschi Graham, Center for Advanced Energy Research, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY

Sokrates Pantelides, Department of Physics & Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN

Ron Schrimpf, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN


Above: Results of percolation model of leakage current through Silica. Click here for details.





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